COPYRIGHT, PLEASE NOTE

All the material on this website is copyrighted to J-P Metsavainio, if not otherwise stated. Any content on this website may not be reproduced without the author’s permission.

Have a visit in my portfolio

Vieraile portfoliossani

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

The Veil Nebula, an experimental 3D-study




This is an experimental test with a 3D-conversion of my astronomical images. Only real elements from my image are used, there is nothing added but the volumetric information!
(In this image, some of the stars are enhanced  for a visual reasons)

NOTE. This is a personal vision about shapes and volumes, based on some scientific data and an artistic impression.


Veil Nebula supernova remnant as a 3D-model
In constellation Cygnus, animation in natural colors


This is a looped video, click to start and stop. Original movie is in HD1080p resolution.


An other version of  the animated Veil
Animation in mapped colors


This is a looped video, click to start and stop. Original movie is in HD1080p resolution.


My original image of the Veil Nebula is used for the animations
Click for the large image

As can be seen here, the compression in YouTube has lost some details from above videos, they are all in original, less compressed, video.

Blog post about this image with technical details:
http://astroanarchy.blogspot.fi/2012/03/veil-nebula-reprocessed-with-some-new.html


An animated GIF

Click for a large image

Blog post about the animated GIF can be seen here:
http://astroanarchy.blogspot.fi/2012/10/an-experiental-3d-animation-from-my.html


Saturday, February 23, 2013

3D-study of the Bubble Nebula



This is an experimental test with a 3D-conversion of my astronomical images. Only real elements from my image are used, there is nothing added but the volumetric information!
(In this image, some of the stars are enhanced  for a visual reasons)

NOTE. This is a personal vision about shapes and volumes, based on some scientific data and an artistic impression.

The Bubble Nebula as a 3D-model


This is a looped video, click to start and stop. Original movie is in HD1080p resolution.



A different Bubble Nebula animation in visual colors


This is a looped video, click to start and stop. Original movie is in HD1080p resolution.


Original 2D-image used for the animation


The animated image is in mapped color palette, this one is in natural colors.
A blog post with technical details can be seen here:
http://astroanarchy.blogspot.fi/2011/03/bubble-nebula-reprocessed.html


Info about the technique used

Due to huge distances, real parallax can't be imaged in most of the astronomical objects.
I have developed an experimental technique to convert my astropics to a artificial volumetric models.

My 3-D experiments are a mixture of science and an artistic impression. I collect distance and other information before I do my 3-D conversion. Usually there are known stars, coursing the ionization, so I can place them at right relative distance. If I know a distance to the nebula, I can fine tune distances of the stars so, that right amount of stars are front and behind of the object.

I use a “rule of thumb” method for stars: brighter is closer, but if a real distance is known, I'm using that. Many 3-D shapes can be figured out just by looking carefully the structures in nebula, such as dark nebulae must be at front of the emission nebulae in order to show up etc...

The general structure of many star forming regions is very same, there is a group of young stars, as an open cluster inside of the nebula. The stellar wind from the stars is then blowing the gas away around the cluster and forming a kind of cavitation – or a hole — around it. The pillar-like formations in the nebula must point to a source of stellar wind, for the same reason.

How accurate the final model is, depends how much I have known and guessed right. The motivation to make those 3-D-studies is just to show, that objects in the images are not like paintings on the canvas but really three dimensional objects floating in the three dimensional space. This generally adds a new dimension to my hobby as an astronomical imager. 

A screen shot of the 3D-model

This 3D-mesh was used as a body for the animated image, there are no textures yet applied in the model.



Friday, February 22, 2013

Thursday, February 21, 2013

A new image, NGC 2174, the Monkey Head Nebula



Image from last Tuesday, 19.02. I managed to use a crack in almost unbreakable cloud cover.
Result, ~4h exposures for the ionized Hydrogen of NGC 2174, the Monkey Head Nebula.
While shooting with my old Meade 12", I shot colors simultaneously with the QHY8 astrocamera, Baader UHCs-filter and the Tokina AT-X 300mm f2.8 camera lens. 


NGC 2174, the Monkey Head Nebula
In the constellation Orion

Image is in visual spectrum and dominated by the red light emitted by ionized Hydrogen, H-alpha. Blueish hues are from ionized Oxygen, O-III. Colors are shot simultaneously with H-a emission by using QHY8 color camera, Tokina AT-X 300mm f2.8 camera lens and Baader UHCs-filter.
Buy a photographic print from HERE

A closeup

Buy a photographic print from HERE

INFO

NGC 2175, it's surraunded by an emission nebula Sh2-252, it's sometimes called as a "Monkey head nebula". NGC 2175 locates in constellation Orion. In my northern location, 65N, this target is not very high, about 39 degrees in maximum elevation. Distance from Oulu, Finland, is about 6350 light years.


Image in mapped colors

Image is in mapped colors from the emission of ionized elements, R=Sulfur, G=Hydrogen and B=Oxygen.
Star colors are shot with a QHY8 color camera, Tokina 300mm f2.8 optics and the Baader UHCs filter.
The open cluster IC 1590 can be seen at middle of the image.
Colors in the nebula are taken from this older image of mine:
Buy a photographic print from HERE

A study about the apparent scale in the sky
Note. A Moon size circle as a scale, click for a large image

More info about this scale study in blog post here:


Technical details:

Processing work flow:
Image acquisition, MaxiDL v5.07.
Stacked and calibrated in CCDStack2.
Levels, curves and color combine in PS CS3.

Optics, Meade LX200 GPS 12" @ f5
Camera, QHY9
Guiding, SXV-AO, an active optics unit, and Lodestar guide camera 8Hz
Image Scale, ~0,8 arc-seconds/pixel
12 x 1200s exposures for the H-alpha, emission of ionized Hydrogen = 4h

Optics and exposures used for colors

Tokina AT-X 300mm at f2.8
QHY8, a cooled single shot color camera
Baader UHC-s filter
Baader IR-cut filter
22x600s = 3,6h

Color channels for a mapped-palette image, O-III and S-II, are from an older image of mine.


A single unprocessed 1200 second frame of H-a emission

A single 20 min. frame, just calibrated and nonliterary stretched to visible. 
Imaged with the QHY9 camera, Baader 7nm H-alpha filter and Meade LX200 12" telescope.


And yes, it really does look like a head of a monkey!








Monday, February 18, 2013

3D-study of NGC 6543, the Cat's eye Nebula




This is an experimental test with a 3D-conversion of my astronomical images. Only real elements from my image are used, there is nothing added but the volumetric information!
(In this image, some of the stars are enhanced  for a visual reasons)

NOTE. This is a personal vision about shapes and volumes, based on some scientific data and an artistic impression.

Cat's Eye Nebula, NGC6543, as a 3D-model


This is a looped video, click to start and stop. Original movie is in HD1080p resolution.


Original 2D-image used for the animation

A blog post with technical details can be seen here:
http://astroanarchy.blogspot.fi/2011/01/cats-eye-nebula-reprocessed.html


Info about the technique used

Due to huge distances, real parallax can't be imaged in most of the astronomical objects.
I have developed an experimental technique to convert my astropics to a artificial volumetric models.

My 3-D experiments are a mixture of science and an artistic impression. I collect distance and other information before I do my 3-D conversion. Usually there are known stars, coursing the ionization, so I can place them at right relative distance. If I know a distance to the nebula, I can fine tune distances of the stars so, that right amount of stars are front and behind of the object.

I use a “rule of thumb” method for stars: brighter is closer, but if a real distance is known, I'm using that. Many 3-D shapes can be figured out just by looking carefully the structures in nebula, such as dark nebulae must be at front of the emission nebulae in order to show up etc...

The general structure of many star forming regions is very same, there is a group of young stars, as an open cluster inside of the nebula. The stellar wind from the stars is then blowing the gas away around the cluster and forming a kind of cavitation – or a hole — around it. The pillar-like formations in the nebula must point to a source of stellar wind, for the same reason.

How accurate the final model is, depends how much I have known and guessed right. The motivation to make those 3-D-studies is just to show, that objects in the images are not like paintings on the canvas but really three dimensional objects floating in the three dimensional space. This generally adds a new dimension to my hobby as an astronomical imager. (Pun intended)







Thursday, February 14, 2013

A new panorama from my IC 1805 material



Since I have shot several overlapping, longer focal length, images out of the IC 1805, the Heart Nebula, I'm able to stitch them together as a mosaic images. 


A two frame panoramic mosaic of IC 1805 details

Image is in HST-palette, from the emission of ionized elements, R=Sulfur, G=Hydrogen and B=Oxygen.

There are two images combined in this mosaic. 

At left an unnamed trunk like formation, the original image with details can be seen here:
http://astroanarchy.blogspot.fi/2012/12/a-detail-from-heart-nebula.html

At right, a closeup image of an unnamed triangular shape, the original image with details can be seen here:
http://astroanarchy.blogspot.fi/2013/02/black-lace-detail-of-ic-1805-heart.html


The mosaic in natural colors


A natural color composition from the emission of ionized elements.
R=80%Hydrogen+20%Sulfur, G=100%Oxygen and B=85%Oxygen+15% Hydrogen to compensate otherwise missing H-beta emission. This composition is very close to a visual spectrum.







Wednesday, February 13, 2013

IC 443, supernova remnant as a closeup



I have shot several times this supernova remnant in Gemini. In this image, there are three different exposure sets combined, first from the year 2010 and two others from this season. Total exposure time is now around 20h. Latest images for this target are shot at 11.02 this week, 3h of H-alpha emission.


A Gemini SNR, IC 443, the "Jellyfish Nebula"
Ra 06h 17m 13s   Dec +22° 31′ 05′′

Image is in HST-palette, from the emission of ionized elements, R=Sulfur, G=Hydrogen and B=Oxygen.


INFO

IC 443 (also known as the Jellyfish Nebula and Sharpless 248 (Sh2-248)) is a Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) in the constellation Gemini. It locates visually near the star Eta Geminorum at distance of about 5000 light years.

IC 443 may be the remains of a supernova that occurred 3,000 - 30,000 years ago. The same supernova event likely created the neutron star CXOU J061705.3+222127, the collapsed remnant of the stellar core. IC 443 is one of the best-studied cases of supernova remnants interacting with surrounding molecular clouds

Source Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IC_443


IC 443 in visual colors

A natural color composition from the emission of ionized elements.
R=80%Hydrogen+20%Sulfur, G=100%Oxygen and B=85%Oxygen+15% Hydrogen to compensate otherwise missing H-beta emission. This composition is very close to a visual spectrum.


Older wide field images of the same target
Click for large images

A wide field image from Spring season 2012, Image info in the blog post here:


Two panel mosaic

A two panel mosaic, info in the original blogpost here:


A study about the apparent scale in the sky
Click for a large image

Note. A Moon size circle as a scale.


Technical details

Processing work flow:
Image acquisition, MaxiDL v5.07.
Stacked and calibrated in CCDStack2.
Levels, curves and color combine in PS CS3.

Optics, Meade LX200 GPS 12" @ f5
Camera, QHY9
Guiding, SXV-AO, an active optics unit, and Lodestar guide camera 8Hz
Image Scale, ~0,8 arc-seconds/pixel
Exposures for the H-alpha, emission of ionized Hydrogen = 20h
Narrowband cahnnels for ionized Oxygen and Sulfur are taken from an older wide field image.


A single unprocessed 1200 second frame of H-a emission


A single 20 min. frame, just calibrated and stretched. Imaged with the QHY9 camera, Baader 7nm H-alpha filter and Meade LX200 12" telescope.







Tuesday, February 12, 2013

A two frame mosaic of IC 1805





This is a two frame mosaic of IC 1805, the Heart Nebula. Image shows a detail, from much large nebula complex, in natural colors. Colors are combined to a visual spectrum from emissions of ionized elements.


 A detail of IC 1805 emission nebula


Natural color composition from the emission of ionized elements.
R=80%Hydrogen+20%Sulfur, G=100%Oxygen and B=85%Oxygen+15% Hydrogen to compensate otherwise missing H-beta emission. This composition is very close to a visual spectrum.


This image in a HST-palette and technical details can be found from my previous post

http://astroanarchy.blogspot.fi/2013/02/black-lace-detail-of-ic-1805-heart.html


A study about the apparent scale in the sky
Moon size circle as a scale

This zoom in series shows the apparent scale of the Heart nebula.
Note. a Moon size circle in images as a scale.
The apparent size of the full Moon is ~30 arc minutes, that's equal to ~0.5 degrees.







Thursday, February 7, 2013

Black Lace, a detail of IC 1805, the Heart Nebula




This have been one of the worst winters for astrophotographing up here 65N. Somehow I managed to shoot six hours of H-alpha light for this target under a bad transparency, seeing was kind of good though. 

Generally I'll like to shoot two or three times more exposures per target but if I'll do so, I might get only four new images per year... For the same reasons I have used my older, wide field, images as a source of color data. Naturally it's better to shoot all the color channel at same focal length but ones again, weather up here is too volatile for that. 
OK, enough whining here. I proudly present the new image of IC 1805 from 5. January, 


Black Lace, a detail of IC 1805, the Heart nebula

A closeup of IC 1805 in mapped colors. Edges of the triangle shape, at middle right, looks like a black lace.
Buy a photographic print from HERE



A mosaic with Melotte 15

Since this new image of mine was overlapping with the Melotte 15 image, I made a two frame mosaic out of them.

A mapped color mosaic image shows the Melotte 15 at upper right corner.

Buy a photographic print from HERE



Black Lace in natural colors

Natural color composition from the emission of ionized elements.
R=80%Hydrogen+20%Sulfur, G=100%Oxygen and B=85%Oxygen+15% Hydrogen to compensate otherwise missing H-beta emission. This composition is very close to a visual spectrum.
Buy a photographic print from HERE


Orientation in the Heart Nebula

The area of interest is marked with a white rectangle.
Buy a photographic print from HERE

INFO

The "Heart Nebula", IC1805 locates about 7500 light years away in constellation Cassiopeia. This is an emission nebula showing glow of ionized elements in a gas cloud and some darker dust lanes.
In a very center of the nebula, lays Melotte 15, it contains few very bright stars, nearly 50 times mass of our Sun, and many dim ones. The solar wind, a radiation pressure, from massive stars makes the gas twist to a various shapes.

Technical details

Processing work flow:
Image acquisition, MaxiDL v5.07.
Stacked and calibrated in CCDStack2.
Levels, curves and color combine in PS CS3.

Optics, Meade LX200 GPS 12" @ f5
Camera, QHY9
Guiding, SXV-AO, an active optics unit, and Lodestar guide camera 8Hz
Image Scale, ~0,8 arc-seconds/pixel
18 x 1200s exposures for the H-alpha, emission of ionized Hydrogen = 6h
Narrowband cahnnels for ionized Oxygen and Sulfur are taken from an older wide field images.


A single unprocessed 1200 second frame of H-a emission

single 20 min. frame, just calibrated and stretched. Imaged with the QHY9 camera, Baader 7nm H-alpha filter and Meade LX200 12" telescope.


Wednesday, February 6, 2013

3D-study of Messier 27, the Dumbbell nebula



This is an experimental test with a 3D-conversion of my astronomical images. Only real elements from my image are used, there is nothing added but the volumetric information!
(In this image, two of the stars are enhanced  for a visual reasons)

NOTE. This is a personal vision about shapes and volumes, based on some scientific data and an artistic impression.


Dumbbell Nebula, M27, 3D-model


This is a looped video, click to start and stop. Original movie is in HD1080p resolution.

Large movie in Vimeo service
(HD720p)
https://vimeo.com/59052389
NOTE. Right click the video to turn HD and Loop on!



Original 2D-image of the Messier 27


More images and technical details in this blog post:
Buy a photographic print from HERE


Info about the technique used


Due to huge distances, real parallax can't be imaged in most of the astronomical objects.
I have developed an experimental technique to convert my astropics to a artificial volumetric models.

My 3-D experiments are a mixture of science and an artistic impression. I collect distance and other information before I do my 3-D conversion. Usually there are known stars, coursing the ionization, so I can place them at right relative distance. If I know a distance to the nebula, I can fine tune distances of the stars so, that right amount of stars are front and behind of the object.

I use a “rule of thumb” method for stars: brighter is closer, but if a real distance is known, I'm using that. Many 3-D shapes can be figured out just by looking carefully the structures in nebula, such as dark nebulae must be at front of the emission nebulae in order to show up etc...

The general structure of many star forming regions is very same, there is a group of  young stars, as an open cluster inside of the nebula. The stellar wind from the stars is then blowing the gas away around the cluster and forming a kind of cavitation – or a hole — around it. The pillar-like formations in the nebula must point to a source of stellar wind, for the same reason.

How accurate the final model is, depends how much I have known and guessed right. The motivation to make those 3-D-studies is just to show, that objects in the images are not like paintings on the canvas but really three dimensional objects floating in the three dimensional space. This generally adds a new dimension to my hobby as an astronomical imager. (Pun intended)







Monday, February 4, 2013

3D-study of the Rosette Nebula


This is an experimental test with a 3D-conversion of my astronomical images. Only real elements from my image are used, there is nothing added but the volumetric information!

NOTE. This is a personal vision about shapes and volumes, based on some scientific data and an artistic impression.


Rosette Nebula 3D-model I




Original 2D-image of the Rosetta Nebula
More images and technical details can be seen in this blog post:
http://astroanarchy.blogspot.fi/2012/12/caldwell-49-rosette-nebula-reprocessed.html



Rosette Nebula 3D-model II



Info about the technique used


Due to huge distances, real parallax can't be imaged in most of the astronomical objects.
I have developed an experimental technique to convert my astropics to a artificial volumetric models.

My 3-D experiments are a mixture of science and an artistic impression. I collect distance and other information before I do my 3-D conversion. Usually there are known stars, coursing the ionization, so I can place them at right relative distance. If I know a distance to the nebula, I can fine tune distances of the stars so, that right amount of stars are front and behind of the object.

I use a “rule of thumb” method for stars: brighter is closer, but if a real distance is known, I'm using that. Many 3-D shapes can be figured out just by looking carefully the structures in nebula, such as dark nebulae must be at front of the emission nebulae in order to show up etc...

The general structure of many star forming regions is very same, there is a group of  young stars, as an open cluster inside of the nebula. The stellar wind from the stars is then blowing the gas away around the cluster and forming a kind of cavitation – or a hole — around it. The pillar-like formations in the nebula must point to a source of stellar wind, for the same reason.

How accurate the final model is, depends how much I have known and guessed right. The motivation to make those 3-D-studies is just to show, that objects in the images are not like paintings on the canvas but really three dimensional objects floating in the three dimensional space. This generally adds a new dimension to my hobby as an astronomical imager. (Pun intended)






A 3D-study of the Simeis 147 supernova remnant



This is an experimental test with a 3D-conversion of my astronomical images. Only real elements from my image are used, there is nothing added but the volumetric information!

NOTE. This is a personal vision about shapes and volumes, based on some scientific data and an artistic impression.


Simeis 147 3D-model as a"fast fly trough"




Original 2D-image of Simeis 147

More images and technical details can be seen in this blog post:
http://astroanarchy.blogspot.fi/2012/02/siemis-147-new-data-added.html



Simeis 147 3D-model as a looped rotation



Info about the technique used


Due to huge distances, real parallax can't be imaged in most of the astronomical objects.
I have developed an experimental technique to convert my astropics to a artificial volumetric models.

My 3-D experiments are a mixture of science and an artistic impression. I collect distance and other information before I do my 3-D conversion. Usually there are known stars, coursing the ionization, so I can place them at right relative distance. If I know a distance to the nebula, I can fine tune distances of the stars so, that right amount of stars are front and behind of the object.

I use a “rule of thumb” method for stars: brighter is closer, but if a real distance is known, I'm using that. Many 3-D shapes can be figured out just by looking carefully the structures in nebula, such as dark nebulae must be at front of the emission nebulae in order to show up etc...

The general structure of many star forming regions is very same, there is a group of  young stars, as an open cluster inside of the nebula. The stellar wind from the stars is then blowing the gas away around the cluster and forming a kind of cavitation – or a hole — around it. The pillar-like formations in the nebula must point to a source of stellar wind, for the same reason.

How accurate the final model is, depends how much I have known and guessed right. The motivation to make those 3-D-studies is just to show, that objects in the images are not like paintings on the canvas but really three dimensional objects floating in the three dimensional space. This generally adds a new dimension to my hobby as an astronomical imager. (Pun intended)